The Arts Society Rutland
Programme for 2018 Thursday 21st June 2018 Addition payment required Anniversary Celebratory Lecture and Lunch at Stanford Hall Intoxicating Cocktail Mary Alexander BA (Hons) MA Between the wars, Paris was the hub of cutting edge experiments  in the visual and performing arts. The city became a magnet for international creative talent, including African-American musicians escaping the restrictions of racial segregation and Prohibition at home. The new 'jazz hot' brought together audiences from the artistic avant- garde, the music halls and the exotic cabarets of Montmartre. A vibrant modernist design style emerged from this dynamic cultural fusion. We will meet the artists, designers, musicians, dancers and impresarios and recreate how it felt to be in the middle of this exciting new cocktail of talent. Click here for the booking form Art Deco influences Thursday 20th September 2018 The Punch and Judy Show - A Subversive Symbol from Commedia Dell'Arte to the Present Day. Bertie Pearce BA (Hons) A puppet play that would have featured a version of Punch was first recorded in England in May 1662, by the diarist Samuel Pepys.  Mr Punch was in Covent Garden at the restoration of the monarchy in 1662, and he was at the Millennium Dome exhibition in Greenwich in 2000 when Punch and Judy shows played daily. He’s got the hump, and he’s keeping it, despite Punch and Judy shows being identified in a government website as one of the twelve most important British icons including Stonehenge, a cup of tea, Alice in Wonderland and the Routemaster bus. The history of Punch & Judy V&A Page on Punch  & Judy Pulliciniello, the Commedia dell’Arte servant, Engraving by Jacques Callot, about 1622. Victoria and Albert Museum, London. Thursday 18th October 2018 'The Dregs of the People Remain' : the Black Death and its Aftermath, its Impact on the People and how they reacted in Society and Art. Imogen Corrigan BA (Hons) It is possible to see a shift in artistic tastes following the plague years which began in the mid C14th. This is understandable considering that we now know that at least 60% of the population of Europe and beyond perished in the first wave and that the disease recurred over the next 130 years. There is a distinct increase in interest in the macabre, but also in explorations of what will happen in the next life; some of it surprisingly optimistic and amusing. We see more interest in ex-pagan images and specific demands for spiritual protection and so what might be seen as a dust-to-dust mentality also becomes one of no tragedy, no triumph The history of the Black Death and the effects. The Black Death, will it ever end? Thursday 15th November 2018.  AGM The Story of the Cook Sisters and how they used Opera to Save Lives. Anne Sebba BA (Hons) Ida and Louise Cook were destined never to marry after  decimation of the men of their generation in World War One. When Ida became a successful Mills and Boon novelist they used their earnings to indulge their love of opera, travelling all over the world but especially to Salzburg. Familiarity with Austria enabled these two eccentric opera loving sisters to undertake dangerous undercover missions in the 1930s rescuing Jewish musicians and others from the Nazis. This talk will explore the world of Opera in the 1920s and 30s - the clothes, music, celebrities, and the signed photographs coveted by fans. It will also show how Opera transformed the lives not just of these two sisters but of at least 29 families they saved. In 2010 the Government posthumously created the Cook sisters British Heroes of the Holocaust. BBC page on the Cook Sisters and their history. Thursday 13th December 2018 'Deck the Halls' David Bostwick BA ( Hons) MA  PhD ALA AMA Christmas, as a time of celebrations, has a very long pedigree. The great midwinter festival, known to the Romans as Saturnalia, is still greeted with feasting and drinking throughout the 12 days of Christmas. Wassail bowls and bobs, boars’ heads stuck with apples, carolling, mumming, riotous games in hall – all presided over by the Lord of Misrule. Twelfth Night signalled an end to the merry anarchy with great pies and rich fruit cakes concealing a bean and a pea. Using contemporary illustrations, this lecture explores the sources and significance of these ancient customs and traditions. History of the Lord of Misrule The Lord of Misrule by Ian Norbury, Woodsculptor Thursday 21st June 2018 (Additional payment required) Anniversary Celebratory Lecture and Lunch at Stanford Hall ' Intoxicating Cocktail ' Mary Alexander BA (Hons  MA Between the wars, Paris was the hub of cutting edge experiments  in the visual and performing arts. The city became a magnet for international creative talent, including African-American musicians escaping the restrictions of racial segregation and Prohibition at home. The new 'jazz hot' brought together audiences from the artistic avant- garde, the music halls and the exotic cabarets of Montmartre. A vibrant modernist design style emerged from this dynamic cultural fusion. We will meet the artists, designers, musicians, dancers and impresarios and recreate how it felt to be in the middle of this exciting new cocktail of talent. Directions to find the venue:-  From the centre of Market Harborough turn onto the Old Coventry Rd (A4304) signposted to Lutterworth (M1) Stanford Hall takes approximately 25 minutes to drive from this point. Keep on the main Rd. A4304 At the far end of North Kilworth turn left following the brown sign post to Stanford Hall. Drive through South Kilworth following the brown signs Turn left to Stanford on Avon signposted 1 1/2 miles. At the T junction in Stanford on Avon turn right ( Church on right ) Shortly the Hall is on your right, come through the gate and up the drive. There are plenty of parking spaces Click here for the booking form Art Deco influences Web site created and maintained by Janet Groome, Handshake Computer Training
Web site and mobile phone pages designed, created and maintained by Janet Groome Handshake Computer Training
Programme for 2018 Thursday 20th September 2018 The Punch and Judy Show (A Subversive Symbol from Commedia Dell'Arte to the Present Day. Bertie Pearce BA (Hons) A puppet play that would have featured a version of Punch was first recorded in England in May 1662, by the diarist Samuel Pepys.  Mr Punch was in Covent Garden at the restoration of the monarchy in 1662, and he was at the Millennium Dome exhibition in Greenwich in 2000 when Punch and Judy shows played daily. He’s got the hump, and he’s keeping it, despite Punch and Judy shows being identified in a government website as one of the twelve most important British icons including Stonehenge, a cup of tea, Alice in Wonderland and the Routemaster bus. The history of Punch & Judy V&A Page on Punch  & Judy Above: Pulliciniello, the Commedia dell’Arte servant, Engraving by Jacques Callot, about 1622. Victoria and Albert Museum, London. Thursday 18th October 2018 'The Dregs of the People Remain' : the Black Death and its Aftermath, its Impact on the People and how they reacted in Society and Art. Imogen Corrigan BA (Hons) It is possible to see a shift in artistic tastes following the plague years which began in the mid C14th. This is understandable considering that we now know that at least 60% of the population of Europe and beyond perished in the first wave and that the disease recurred over the next 130 years. There is a distinct increase in interest in the macabre, but also in explorations of what will happen in the next life; some of it surprisingly optimistic and amusing. We see more interest in ex-pagan images and specific demands for spiritual protection and so what might be seen as a dust- to-dust mentality also becomes one of no tragedy, no triumph The history of the Black Death and the effects. The Black Death, will it ever end? Thursday 15th November 2018 .  AGM The Story of the Cook Sisters and how they used Opera to Save Lives. Anne Sebba BA ( Hons ) Ida and Louise Cook were destined never to marry after  decimation of the men of their generation in World War One. When Ida became a successful Mills and Boon novelist they used their earnings to indulge their love of opera, travelling all over the world but especially to Salzburg. Familiarity with Austria enabled these two eccentric opera loving sisters to undertake dangerous undercover missions in the 1930s rescuing Jewish musicians and others from the Nazis. This talk will explore the world of Opera in the 1920s and 30s - the clothes, music, celebrities, and the signed photographs coveted by fans. It will also show how Opera transformed the lives not just of these two sisters but of at least 29 families they saved. In 2010 the Government posthumously created the Cook sisters British Heroes of the Holocaust. BBC page on the Cook Sisters and their history. Thursday 13th December 2018 'Deck the Halls' David Bostwick BA (Hons) MA  PhD ALA AMA Christmas, as a time of celebrations, has a very long pedigree. The great midwinter festival, known to the Romans as Saturnalia, is still greeted with feasting and drinking throughout the 12 days of Christmas. Wassail bowls and bobs, boars’ heads stuck with apples, carolling, mumming, riotous games in hall – all presided over by the Lord of Misrule. Twelfth Night signalled an end to the merry anarchy with great pies and rich fruit cakes concealing a bean and a pea. Using contemporary illustrations, this lecture explores the sources and significance of these ancient customs and traditions. History of the Lord of Misrule Thursday 21st June 2018 Anniversary Celebratory Lecture and Lunch at Stanford Hall 'Intoxicating Cocktail' Mary Alexander BA ( Hons ) MA Between the wars, Paris was the hub of cutting edge experiments  in the visual and performing arts. The city became a magnet for international creative talent, including African-American musicians escaping the restrictions of racial segregation and Prohibition at home. The new 'jazz hot' brought together audiences from the artistic avant-garde, the music halls and the exotic cabarets of Montmartre. A vibrant modernist design style emerged from this dynamic cultural fusion. We will meet the artists, designers, musicians, dancers and impresarios and recreate how it felt to be in the middle of this exciting new cocktail of talent. Directions to find the venue:-  From the centre of Market Harborough turn onto the Old Coventry Rd (A4304) signposted to Lutterworth (M1) Stanford Hall takes approximately 25 minutes to drive from this point. Keep on the main Rd. A4304 At the far end of North Kilworth turn left following the brown sign post to Stanford Hall. Drive through South Kilworth following the brown signs Turn left to Stanford on Avon signposted 1 1/2 miles. At the T junction in Stanford on Avon turn right ( Church on right ) Shortly the Hall is on your right, come through the gate and up the drive. There are plenty of parking spaces Click here for the booking form Art Deco influences
The Arts Society Rutland